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How to Repair a Window Screen

Updated: Nov 24, 2022

Materials Needed


-Tape measure -Scissors -Roll of screen material -Spline (a rubber or plastic cord that fits into a groove) -Spline roller (a tool used to insert spline into a screen)


Tape measure


Before you can purchase a replacement window screen, you'll need to measure the opening in the window frame to get an accurate idea of the size of screen you need. To do this, use a tape measure to measure the width and height of the visible screen opening. Record these measurements so you can refer to them when you're at the store.


Scissors


Use a sharp pair of scissors to cut through the fabric of the screen. Be careful not to cut yourself on the sharp edges of the metal screen. Once you have cut through the fabric, remove the damaged section of screen and discard it.


Staple gun and staples


If your screen is torn, you may be able to patch it with a piece of screen material and a few well-placed staples. To do this, you'll need a staple gun loaded with 3/4-inch (or 1-inch for heavy-duty screens) staples. You'll also need a single-edge razor blade, wire cutters, pliers, and duct tape. First, cut a piece of new screen that's at least 6 inches larger than the damaged area in all directions. If the tear is in a corner of the screen, make your patch twice as large in that direction so there will be plenty of new screen to staple into the wood framing. Next, use the razor blade to remove any loose threads or other debris from around the tear. Then lay the new piece of screen over the damaged area and pull it taut. Starting in one corner, use the staple gun to secure the new screen to the frame. Be sure to keep the staples about an inch apart all around the perimeter of the patch. Finally, use duct tape to cover any sharp points on the underside of the frame where someone might get scratched. That's it! Your window screen is as good as new.


New screen


If you're replacing an old screen or making a new one, you'll need to choose a type of screen mesh. There are several common types, each with different properties. Aluminum screen is the most common. It's strong and doesn't corrode, but it can dent and is a good conductor of heat and cold. Fiberglass screen is stronger than aluminum and doesn't corrode, but it's a poor conductor of heat and cold. Stainless steel screen is very strong and doesn't corrode, but it's very expensive. The next step is to choose the size of the screen mesh. The smaller the mesh, the finer the bugs it will keep out. The most common sizes are 18x14 (coarse), 20x20 (medium), and 24x24 (fine). Once you've chosen the type and size of mesh, you'll need to cut it to fit your window. To do this, first Measure the width and height of your window opening. Then, add two inches to each measurement. This will give you enough material to secure the screen in place. Next, use a utility knife to cut the screen along your measurements. Be sure to cut slowly and evenly to avoid creating any frayed edges. Now that you have your new screen, it's time to install it!


Measuring the Screen


To repair a window screen, you will first need to remove the screen from the window. Once the screen is removed, you will need to measure it so that you can buy a replacement that is the same size. Most screens are made of metal or fiberglass and have a wooden or plastic frame.


Width: Measure the distance between the inside edges of the screen frame at the top, middle, and bottom. Use the smallest of these measurements.


Width: Measure the distance between the inside edges of the screen frame at the top, middle, and bottom. Use the smallest of these measurements. Height: Measure the distance between the inside edges of the screen frame at the left and right sides. Use the smallest of these measurements. Cut a piece of screening that is 2 inches wider and 2 inches longer than these dimensions. For example, if your screen width measures 24 inches wide (top, middle, and bottom), you will need to cut a piece of screening that is 28 inches wide. Place the new piece of screening over the damaged area and press it into place. Starting at one corner, use your utility knife to score (cut) along each side of the new piece of screening. Remove the excess screening by snapping it off along your score lines.


Height: Measure the distance between the inside edges of the screen frame at the left, middle, and right. Use the smallest of these measurements.


To repair a window screen, first remove the damaged screen from the window. To do this, first remove the retainer spline (rubber or silicone tubing that holds the screen in place in the frame) with a utility knife. Then, gently pull the screen out of the frame. Next, measure the height and width of the opening in the frame to determine how much replacement screen you will need. Then, cut a piece of replacement screen to these dimensions and set it aside.


Cutting the Screen


The first step is to remove the old screen. To do this, you will need to cut the screen along the frame. Be sure to cut carefully so that you do not damage the frame. Once the screen is cut, you can remove it from the frame. Be careful not to rip or tear the screen. Next, you will need to measure the dimensions of the opening in the frame. Measure both the width and height so that you know how much screen you will need to purchase.


Cut the new screen so that it extends ½ inch beyond the measurements you took in step 2.


1. Measure the width and height of the screen frame. 2. Cut the new screen so that it extends ½ inch beyond the measurements you took in step 2. 3. Lay the new screen over the old one, aligning the edges. 4. Tape the new screen to the frame with masking or duct tape, being careful not to tape over any holes in the frame. 5. Turn the frame over and gently push out any wrinkles from under the new screen with a putty knife or your fingers. 6. Trim off any excess screen material with a utility knife. 7


Attaching the Screen


screen. Use your utility knife to cut through the fabric where the holes are. Be careful not to cut yourself, and be sure to dispose of the blade when you're finished. With the holes cut, place the screen over the window, making sure that the fabric is smoothed out and that there are no wrinkles or looseness in the screen. Once you're satisfied with the placement, take your adhesive and apply a generous amount around the entire edge of the window, as well as around each of the holes you cut. Make sure that you apply enough adhesive so that it seeps through holes in the screen and makes contact with the wood beneath it. After you've applied adhesive all around, take your frame and set it on top of the screen so that the holes in each line up. Once you're satisfied with the placement, use your drill to screw each corner in place. Start with one screw in each corner, then add an additional screw every few inches until the entire frame is firmly attached to the window.


Place the screen over the opening in the window frame.


To repair a window screen, you will need to gather a few supplies. You will need a new piece of screen that is the same size as the old one, a utility knife, screen fabric pliers, and some wood glue. You may also need some heavy duty scissors if the old screen is particularly damaged. Once you have gathered your supplies, begin by taking out the old screen. Carefully cut it away from the frame with your utility knife. Be careful not to damage the frame itself. Next, take your new piece of screen and place it over the opening in the window frame. Use your screen fabric pliers to secure the new screen in place. Make sure that it is tight and there are no gaps. Finally, apply a bead of wood glue around the perimeter of the new screen. This will help to hold it in place and prevent it from coming loose over time. Allow the glue to dry completely before using the window again.


Fold the excess screen at the top down over the back of the frame and staple it in place.


Fold the excess screen at the top down over the back of the frame and staple it in place. Next, fold the excess screen at the bottom up over the back of the frame and staple it in place. Finally, fold the excess screen on each side in towards the center of the frame and staple it in place.


Fold the excess screen at the bottom up over the back of the frame and staple it in place.


Use a flathead screwdriver to pry the spline out of the groove in the frame. This will release the old screen so you can remove it. If the spline is old and brittle, it may break, in which case you’ll need to replace it. Unroll the new screen and cut it to size with a utility knife. Place the new screen over the opening and tuck it into the groove. Start at one end of the screen and use a flathead screwdriver or spline-rolling tool to press the new spline into the groove. Work your way around the perimeter of the screen, pressing the spline into place as you go.


Fold the excess screen at the sides in, and staple them in place.


Fold the excess screen at the sides in, and staple them in place. At the top and bottom of the screen, cut 6" lengths of screening, and fold them in half. fit these over the end of the screen on each side, overlapping the side folds that you already stapled in place. staple these top and bottom folds in place.


Trim off any excess screen with scissors.


Use a utility knife to score the repair area along the existing frame of the screen. This will ensure that your new patch will lay flat and bond well with the old screen. Cut only as much of the old screen away as necessary to make room for your new patch. Next, use a straight edge and scissors to cut your new piece of screen material. Again, make sure to leave enough extra material all around the perimeter so that you can complete your repairs without any gaps. Now it’s time to apply some adhesive to hold your new piece of screen in place. Use a generous bead of adhesive along all four edges of the hole. Be sure to smooth it out so that there are no air pockets or gaps. Finally, press your new piece of screen into place and secure it with some staples or tacks around the perimeter. You’re now ready to enjoy your newly repaired window screen!

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